Agreement To Not Use Nuclear Weapons

The US policy of nuclear division was originally intended to help prevent nuclear proliferation, notably by convincing the Federal Republic at the time not to develop an independent nuclear capability, by assuring it that in the event of war with the Warsaw Pact, West Germany would be able to use (American) nuclear weapons to defend itself. (Until that date of the entire war, however, the weapons themselves would remain in U.S. hands.) The aim was to limit the spread of countries with their own nuclear weapons programmes and to ensure that NATO allies did not choose the path of proliferation. [39] (West Germany was discussed in the United States. Secret service estimates for a number of years as a country that has the potential to develop its own nuclear capabilities if Bonn officials were not convinced that their defense against the Soviet Union and its allies might otherwise be satisfied. [40]) At the time of treaty negotiation, NATO had secret agreements on the sharing of nuclear weapons, under which the United States supplied nuclear weapons deployed and stockpiled by other NATO countries. Some argue that this is an act of dissemination contrary to Articles I and II of the Treaty. One counter-argument is that the US controlled weapons stored inside NATO countries and there was no transfer of arms or control over them «except and until a decision was made to go to war where the treaty would no longer control,» so there would be no violation of the NPT. [35] These agreements were disclosed to some of the states, including the Soviet Union, that negotiated the treaty, but most of the states that signed the NPT in 1968 were not aware of these agreements and interpretations at that time. [36] Fihn pointed out that «the Non-Proliferation Treaty aims to prevent nuclear proliferation and eliminate nuclear weapons, and this treaty implements it. There is no way to undermine the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty by banning nuclear weapons. This is the ultimate objective of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. In the NATO letter, Rühle indicated that he was, according to supporters, the intention to strengthen Article VI of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which requires good faith efforts to negotiate effective nuclear disarmament measures.

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